About EJ Moosa

EJ Moosa believes that a smaller government is a more efficient government. He believes that better analysis leads to better solutions. A graduate of Georgia State University In Business Administration, EJ grew up in Cobb County graduating from Osborne High School and worked at several Atlanta companies including First Atlanta, IBM, and Six Flags over Georgia.

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A GDOT Traffic Tutorial

You’ve heard lots of information on traffic in Johns Creek.  Many of the conclusions I feel are based on erroneous assumptions and intuitions. The GDOT (Georgia Department of Transportation) surveys data at locations throughout our state and you have access to that data for yourself to confirm or deny your very own assumptions about the traffic you personally experience. Continue reading

Traffic Choking Points

One of the biggest issues we face is how to get more vehicles through an intersection at a minimal cost.

One thing we can do at many of our intersections is to eliminate Traffic Choking Points and utilize the right turn lanes as both a right turn and through lane, increasing the through volume of traffic 40%-50% immediately.

This one improvement could eliminate much of the delay on many of our busiest roads without the need to widen the corridor. Continue reading

Minor Improvements Can Yield Major Benefits

A truck with a high load underestimated the height of his load by 2 inches and found himself wedged into the entrance of a tunnel.  Unable to back out, experts were called to come and see what could be done to get the truck removed.

All of the engineers crowded around scratching their heads and making drastic suggestions.

Finally a little boy walked up, looked at the engineers and suggested “Why don’t you just let the air out of the tires. Continue reading

Getting 141 Moving: Another Intersection That Needs To Be FATTER

Where is one of the biggest opportunities to get traffic on 141 moving in the morning?  Anyone that drives south out of Johns Creek would agree that it is East Jones Bridge and 141.  Below is a depiction of the standard backup I have seen between the hours of 7:00 am and 9:00 am.

The orange represents the backup southbound.  The red on the east and western sides of the intersection represents the vehicles on those sides you see when you finally get to pass through the intersection.  So what is wrong with that picture?

It’s important to note that nearly every vehicle east and west bound makes it through the light with just one cycle of the lights at the intersection.

Here is an aerial view of the intersection:

 

As you can see, only one lane in each direction east and west travel straight.  With no additional asphalt the east bound side could be configured to carry two lanes straight through the intersection.  But they need to add an additional through lane westbound.

(What is a FATTER Intersection? http://ejmoosa.com/blog3/2017/02/15/what-should-we-do-to-improve-johns-creek-traffic-flow-on-141/)

Doing this would make this intersection MUCH more efficient at a minimal cost. That would have the ability to keep this light green longer and move this traffic through the corridor.

Just two lights down at 141 and Peachtree Corners Circle, the light is green for 4 minutes.  There is no backup heading south at this light whatsoever.

Also, with such short queues on the east and west bound sides of the intersection should indicate that they could keep the light green longer anyway.  They have, for some reason, chosen not to.

Finally, they could do what we have done in other areas such as the stretch between Old Alabama and State Bridge on 141 and make the area three lanes through all the way to Spalding Drive, and this would require no additional asphalt.

Summary:

  1. Fatter intersection east and west bound reduces red light time on 141
  2. Three lanes southbound using existing asphalt increases southbound capacity up to 50%.
  3.  Longer green light times than 141 south currently has increases the volume of vehicles per light cycle.

We could get this traffic moving drastically without destroying the entire corridor and at a minimal cost.

Unfortunately, we wait while the City of Johns Creek works to convince everyone the only solution is three lanes in all directions.

Click here to see more issues and suggestions on traffic:  www.ejmoosa.com

 

What Should We Do To Improve Johns Creek Traffic Flow on 141?

Residents of Johns Creek who travel the 141 corridor have understood just how slow that ride can be.  Some people, who have read what I have written on the cost of traffic delays have asked me what can be done, other than widening 141 to six lanes?

I have, on those occasions, suggested that it’s the side roads along the 141 corridor that need a bit of widening at the interchange  rather than our entire corridor.

Here’s why:

Let’s take the intersection at the corner of Parson’s Road and 141 as our example. As configured today,  has the typical one left turn lane, one right turn lane and one through lane as many of the intersections along the corridor have.

 

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Johns Creek Traffic Volumes: Not As Advertised

The City of Johns Creek has created a myth about our traffic volumes.  Either that or the GDOT Web Server, which stores thousands of data points for traffic across the state and which is used for traffic planning is entirely worthless and wrong.

The City of Johns Creek tells us we have an ever growing body of traffic from Forsyth County.  I have challenged that idea over the last two years only to be summarily dismissed by City Officials.

Once again here is the most updated data from GDOT which clearly shows no major increases on 141 over the last decade EXCEPT for two locations.


 

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The Trump Card: VETO

As Trump moves forward to become President of the United States(POTUS), you’d think that things were chaotic in DC.  Nothing could be further fro the truth.  Yes there are some that are getting their feathers ruffled(and that is a good thing).

If you want to see if Trump is actually draining the swamp in DC, watch just how many times he uses his Veto Power.  Because if Congress is not getting vetoed legislation sent back to them, then you will know that the Swamp is not being drained.

Yes, the Veto can be overridden.  But that takes compromise among those under the Capital Dome.  And we have not seen that sort of cooperation for decades.  Instead we have had the majority run over the minority not based on solid ideas and concepts, but on sheer force.

Trump can change that quickly and effectively.  Trump, hopefully, will not have favorite stooges under the Capital Dome.  Hopefully, he will spread out who he goes to to push forward valuable legislation.

Most importantly, Trump can Veto the thousands of Executive Orders put forth by Obama and Company, and do so quickly.  Trump, who feels precedent has no value whatsoever, will do more the first week by reversing the bad choices of Obama, than any other POTUS in modern history.

And that is a good thing.

The Federal Reserve Bank: Pumping Fuel onto the Bonfire of Inflation

We are in very uncertain times.  And they are becoming more uncertain.  The Federal Reserve Bank(FRB) just raised interest rates .25% and has stated it is their objective to raise rates perhaps 3 times in 2017, in an effort to effectively curb inflation.

And while that may seem to make sense based on the way both the FRB has worked in the past, and what we have been told about inflation and how it works, these actions, perversely, are going to have the opposite effect this time around.  Should I be correct, then the raising rates will actually fuel inflation, which will force more rate hikes, and then even more inflation. Continue reading